Sit less, move more to cut early risk of heart diseases

Sit less, move more to cut early risk of heart diseases

Sedentary lifestyle can not only increase the risk factors of diabetes, impaired insulin sensitivity but also risks of heart attack and stroke, and overall higher risk of death.

Researchers from their latest study quote “Sit less and move more” for a healthier lifestyle and reducing the overall death risk from any cause.

These sedentary behaviour traits include sitting, reclining, working at desks long hours, watching TV or lying down while awake. Such ‘inactive activities’ indicate lesser energy expenditure, which is less than or equal to 1.5 metabolic equivalents, or METs.

Researchers suggest opting for leisurely walking or house chores that uses about 2.5 metabolic equivalents, or moderate to vigorous physical activity which usually uses 3.0 or more METs. The study however added that moderate to vigorous physical activity alone does not totally cut down the impact of sedentary time. Even those who follow moderate physical activity can be affected, if they keep spending a lot of their time being sedentary.

Deborah Rohm Young, Director at Kaiser Permanente in California, US says, “Despite of much of the physical activity someone involves, prolonged sedentary time could however negatively impact the health of your heart and blood vessels.”

The best advice researchers give is to sit less and make a move. “We don’t have information about how much sedentary behaviour is bad for health — the best advice at this time is to ‘sit less and move more’,” Young noted.

According to American Heart Association, 75 minutes of vigorous exercise or 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week can cut down the health risks. But researchers suggest that instead of lumping all the exercise into one or two days, try to allocate it as consistent activity every day, which benefits you more.

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